Sunday, November 7, 2010

Ironmonger's Terrain Tutorial: Large Woods pt. II

Greetings and salutations!

This second part shall pick up right where the first one left off, with the material on hand, the outline of the terrain piece drawn, and the Masonite set to be cut. Before any more work was undertaken (and especially prior to the usage of high-powered electric tools intended to cut and disassemble with harsh violence!), an amount of preparation needs be undertaken. The first step was to assemble all of the tools needed (as well as any ancillary items required) for the task, so as to not needing to go running off for a pen or ruler or whatnot when you're right in the middle of cutting up a 2 1/2'x4' piece of Masonite! After you've gotten all your tools and such together, you MUST WEAR PROTECTION! The most highly recommended set of protective equipment involves 3 separate pieces of kit to insure you don't get hurt, as well as making your cutting/sanding experience quick and easy.


The first piece of equipment I'd recommend is a dust mask:

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This, coupled with a pair of safety glasses/goggles is the easiest, cheapest, and most basic set up you can have when working with air-bourne particles, dust, resin, etc.:

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Topped off with a sturdy pair of gloves, your three pieces of safety kit are complete. However (and I've learned this/am learning this from personal experience, if you intend on undertaking a major project such as this, and probably have a mind to undertake similar major projects in the future (as well as working with airbrushes, resin (from Forge World, Warhammer Forge, and various other companies), you'll probably wish to invest a bit more time and energy into acquiring a respectable safety kit. Trust me, after your first major sanding and cutting session, when you're still spitting out little bits of Masonite particles and you eyes are itchy from all the windbourne guck, you'll know why!

With that said, think about investing in a full mask respirator. These things are easy to use, eliminate the need for two pieces of kit (glasses and mask as separate), and really keep you sealed away from all those harmful contaminates. One has a WIDE selection to choose from, and as with most things of this nature the price fluctuates between reasonable and ludicrous:

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You don't even need the full mask if you don't desire it, and instead may opt for a half-mask respirator:

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Though better then a dust mask, these pieces still allow the eyes to be irritated. My final piece of advice on the subject? If you want to really go hard-core, and are expecting to be doing alot of modeling with terrain over the coming years, go full mask. As well, seriously consider investing in a set of framer gloves: they're a bit pricy, but that time you accidently lay your Dremel across the back of your knuckles whilst it remains running, you'll know why they're worth it!

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Ok, then: back to the show!

So, I've got all my safety equipment available ready, may tools handy, and my material marked out: it's time to cut! Now, you should really, REALLY be doing this type of cutting with either a pair of saw horses or a table fitted with vices (or clamps, at the least), but my current living conditions precludes either of these from being a possibility, so I'm doing the cutting the old fashioned way, and just being as CAUTIOUS as possible. If you don't feel comfortable cutting in this manner yourself, then DO NOT DO IT!!! Fingers do NOT grow back, and the femoral artery does NOT tie off as quickly as one sees in Due Date! Again, if you are not 100% certain that you can cut without confidence, discretion, and another person (a competent adult) present...JUST DON'T DO IT!!! Either wait until you are in a better position to cut in the above-recommended manner, or take your piece of Masonite to someone who is able to cut it for you, such as a home improvement centre.

I myself have roughly a decade of experience working with power tools and cutting various materials, so I boldly proceeded cutting out the basic outline of the terrain piece:

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As you can see, I was in possession of a Jigsaw, though the much-preferred tool to use in a case such as this would be a Rotary saw. This tool required several times readjustment with the material being cut, and more then once I was forced to stop the process, determine just how exactly I wanted to proceed, and then shift/turn the Masonite for better purchase/cutting angles.

At long last, though, I was finished:

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With the basics shape now cut out (and the piece, though still sizable, now much more manageable!), I needed to bevel the edges with a Dremel rotary tool. I could have used some coarse-grit sand paper for this task, but it would have taken quite a few pieces of sand paper, as well as a hugely long period of time to accomplish. I'll not post pictures of the Dremeling, but as you can see below, the Dremel is THE best tool with which to accomplish this task. Use it. If you want to model in any serious fashion and don't own one already...buy one. Do it now.

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Coming soon: Pt. III: selection/placement of 'trees,' putting in stumps, and making the track way.

Stay tuned...

1 comment:

  1. "and especially prior to the usage of high-powered electric tools intended to cut and disassemble with harsh violence!"

    Awesome.

    ReplyDelete